Presidential Records Act Gets New Teeth

Good. Presidents behave better when they know history is not only watching, but taking notes.

UNREDACTED

Illustrated map of the 13 Presidential Library administered by the National Archives and Records Administration. Photo: George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum. Map of the 13 Presidential Library administered by NARA. Photo: George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum.

The Presidential Records Act has come a long way since George W. Bush’s attempt to eviscerate it in 2001. The Act recently gained teeth that will, among other improvements: establish a process for the publication of presidential records after the president leaves office, making it harder for former executives to block publication of their records by citing executive privilege; forbid executive branch officials from conducting government business over personal email, thereby evading the FOIA; and modernize records management by expanding and clarifying the definition of electronic records.

You want these records? Photo:ThinkProgress You want these records? Photo:ThinkProgress

On November 1, 2001, President Bush signed Executive Order 13233, giving former presidents, vice presidents, and their heirs the indefinite authority to block the release of White House records. The White House’s intrusion was confounding, considering the infrequency former executives and their designated…

View original post 934 more words

Advertisements


Categories: Hackers

Well, tell us what you think!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: